• Ted Fraser

Satire: To Fix School System, Let Students Cut Class


Disclaimer: This is a satirical proposal and in no way represents the views of Citadel High School and/or the HRSB.

After countless weeks of brainstorming, reflecting, and refining, I have determined that the best possible thing to do to improve the current school system is to reward students for skipping class.

The reward is irrelevant in the sense that the experience of cutting class in itself is the reward. However, some options that could be considered include: an increase in the student's grade, caf coupons, money, or if the student skips enough, a scholarship. Although no schools to my knowledge have implemented a policy like this, there are schools that have, in the past, punished students for cutting class. This means that if Citadel High introduced this policy, it would be the first of its kind. This would make Citadel a global pioneer in progressive and forward-thinking teaching techniques.

There are three main reasons to follow through with this proposal.

Firstly, with almost 1300 students at Citadel High School, classes tend to get a little crowded. With students skipping school, class sizes are immediately reduced. Class size has been a hot topic in the media recently, and smaller class sizes would no doubt positively affect students. Now, a teacher can do meaningful work and develop a strong, personal relationship with a few students instead of trying to successfully teach and cater to the needs of 30-40 students.

Secondly, with fewer students to support and thus fewer materials to purchase, taxpayers would save millions of dollars a year. This money could be reallocated elsewhere. For instance, it could be spent on building better infrastructure, healthcare, job programs, unemployment insurance, or helping to lower the cost of university tuition.

Lastly, and maybe most importantly, letting kids cut class will give them authentic, real life experiences that will prepare them for the workforce and life after school. What better way to prepare students for real life than to let them experience it firsthand? We should let students live their lives without any handholding, advice, or preparation. This will plunge them directly into the real world and give them a taste of what being an adult is all about.

If this is thought to be too big of a step, we should at least establish a course in which students are allowed to do whatever they want. To start out, it would only be one block per year for grade 11s, and one block per semester for grade 12s.

Of course, although the proposal is close to perfect, there are only a few, trivial problems that would arise from implementing this policy. The potential problems could include: being a liability to the school, having to catch up on missed work and not learning the curriculum, creating a habit that could lead to skipping work, etc.

However, if you're skipping class, you can make up the work you're missing then anyway.

Once again, this is a satirical piece and in no way represents the views of Citadel High School or the HRSB.